TITUSVILLE, Pa.  – Taikoza’s East Winds Ensemble will bring its big drums, powerful rhythms and room-thumping energy to the University of Pittsburgh at Titusville when it performs next month.

 

The ensemble will perform at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, in Henne Auditorium.

 

The musicians perform a highly visual show of traditional and modern music, playing drums up to 3 feet in diameter and other Japanese instruments while wearing colorful traditional costumes.

 

The group has performed all over the world and in some of the most prestigious halls and locations, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Boston Symphony Hall, Moscow’s Tchaikovsky Hall and House of Music, and Osaka Festival Hall.

 

The ensemble has also appeared on ESPN, NBC, and the History Channel, and its music is featured on Nintendo’s Wii game Red Steel 1 and 2.

 

“Something strange and wonderful is coming your way,” according to Eric Hubler of the Washington Post. “There was thunder and there was lightning and there was the sea crashing against a cliff and volcanos.”

 

A reviewer from the Nichi Bei Times wrote, “Few adjectives can explain the sound, emotion and overall experience of the pounding drums of a live performance. My senses were rattled.”

 

Tickets are available in advance by calling 814-827-4431 or can be purchased on the night of the show. A themed buffet-style dinner will precede the concert from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in McKinney Commons. Tickets for the dinner and show are $15 per person in advance, $20 if purchased the night of the show. Tickets for only the performance are $10 per person; $5 for students in high school and younger. Tickets for only the dinner are $10 per person. Pitt-Titusville students, faculty and staff will receive one free ticket to the show with a valid ID.

 

The performance is part of the Year of Pitt Global, an initiative to integrate local and international perspectives that advance new knowledge and groundbreaking innovation while fostering cultural awareness, worldwide partnerships and life-changing research.